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Wednesday, March 14

  1. page Opisthopatus roseus edited {distribution.png} {http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_oMo21TEXETE/SUajZnm4TCI/AAAAAAAAAGI/aQ7NVxPunsU/s32…
    {distribution.png} {http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_oMo21TEXETE/SUajZnm4TCI/AAAAAAAAAGI/aQ7NVxPunsU/s320/velvet+worm.jpg}
    http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/15389/0#
    http://www.arkive.org/pink-velvet-worm/opisthopatus-roseus/

    O. roseus a pink Peripatopsid found exclusively in the Ngele Forest in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. They are colloquially known as pink velvet worms. They have 18 pairs of legs going down the length of their body, as well as water repellant papillae, which they use as sensory organs in order to taste and smell.
    O. roseus is nocturnal and carnivorous. They feed on mites, small spiders and mollusks. They immobilize their prey with a sticky substance. They then bite their prey in order to inject a digestive fluid to help to break down the tissue. Once the flesh has been partially digested, they eat it.
    The species is known to be viviparous, with the gestation period being somewhere between 12 to 13 months. Each female gives birth to approximately 30 offspring per mating season. The offspring resemble adults from birth, and do not have a larval stage. O. roseus most likely reaches sexual maturity sometime between 9 and 11 months, and can live for up to seven years.
    For a long time, O. roseus was thought to be extinct. In 1996 however, they were rediscovered. Their habitat is largely threatened bogging, and their numbers have dwindled. They are now listed as being critically endangered. Efforts to preserve its habitat have been made, but an alarming amount of the Ngele Forest has been destroyed, leaving behind only small patches of the forest.
    Sources:
    http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/15389/0#
    http://www.arkive.org/pink-velvet-worm/opisthopatus-roseus/

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    6:33 pm
  2. page Euperipatoides kanangrensis edited {http://www.mundodosanimais.pt/wp-media/imagens/fossil-vivo-vermes-aveludados.jpg} During later…
    {http://www.mundodosanimais.pt/wp-media/imagens/fossil-vivo-vermes-aveludados.jpg}
    During later stages of development, the neuroectoderm proliferates extensively. The anterior part of the head has newly formed neuron precursor cells that occupy most of the volume. The antenna attached on the worm’s head form the dorsolateral side of the anterior somite. However, antennas do not have its own neuroectoderm and onset of its formation. Neurons, instead migrate out to the appendage form the nearby region of the developing brain. The tract is formed and positioned horizontally in the brain, in line with the antennal commissure. Segments associated with the onychophoran eye and antenna are not homologous with segments carrying equivalent structures. There is evidence to prove that there is a terminal mouth on this worm.
    Sources:

    http://www.genomesize.com/result_species.php?id=5407
    http://ukpmc.ac.uk/abstract/MED/20618432/reload=0;jsessionid=6w3n6hCynLnK49AWZohD.2
    During later stages of development, the neuroectoderm proliferates extensively. The anterior part of the head has newly formed neuron precursor cells that occupy most of the volume. The antenna attached on the worm’s head form the dorsolateral side of the anterior somite. However, antennas do not have its own neuroectoderm and onset of its formation. Neurons, instead migrate out to the appendage form the nearby region of the developing brain. The tract is formed and positioned horizontally in the brain, in line with the antennal commissure. Segments associated with the onychophoran eye and antenna are not homologous with segments carrying equivalent structures. There is evidence to prove that there is a terminal mouth on this worm.
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    6:26 pm
  3. page Peripatopsis balfouri (deleted) edited
    6:22 pm
  4. page Epiperipatus biolleyi edited ... http://www.art.com/products/p964362889-sa-i4090198/o-louis-mazzatenta-epiperipatus-biolleyi-a-…
    ...
    http://www.art.com/products/p964362889-sa-i4090198/o-louis-mazzatenta-epiperipatus-biolleyi-a-type-of-onychophoranic-arthopod.htm
    http://animals.jrank.org/pages/1725/Velvet-Worms-Onychophora-NO-COMMON-NAME-Epiperipatus-biolleyi-SPECIES-ACCOUNT.html
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    6:22 pm
  5. page Epiperipatus biolleyi edited {http://cache2.artprintimages.com/lrg/38/3887/MYWJF00Z.jpg} http://www.art.com/products/p964362…
    {http://cache2.artprintimages.com/lrg/38/3887/MYWJF00Z.jpg}
    http://www.art.com/products/p964362889-sa-i4090198/o-louis-mazzatenta-epiperipatus-biolleyi-a-type-of-onychophoranic-arthopod.htm
    http://animals.jrank.org/pages/1725/Velvet-Worms-Onychophora-NO-COMMON-NAME-Epiperipatus-biolleyi-SPECIES-ACCOUNT.html

    Adults measure from 1.5 to 2 inches in length. They are usually rusty brown or pinkish with dark papillae and a stripe along the back. It’s antennae and legs are gray. The females are around 30 pairs with legs while males have 26 to 28 pairs. This species is usually found in Costa Rica in low mountain forests inside rotting logs or in natural cavities in the soil. They tend to avoid light and walk at speeds of 0.4 inches per second. If these species are found in the wild, they would be missing legs and containing scars. These worms are not known to impact people and their activities. Their sperm packets are deposited into the reproductive opening. Few information is known about their diet in the wild.
    This species is rather different because in 87 hours, it changes its artificial burrows 2.89 times. They show a tendency for the burrow by facing it. Many would think that this would cause much competition amongst burrows, but studies do not show this. Usually pairs of this species rest together. There are around seven resting body postures identified. They hide from direct sunlight. Their secretion has a bitter taste and dissolves in no more than three seconds.
    Sources:
    http://www.art.com/products/p964362889-sa-i4090198/o-louis-mazzatenta-epiperipatus-biolleyi-a-type-of-onychophoranic-arthopod.htm
    http://animals.jrank.org/pages/1725/Velvet-Worms-Onychophora-NO-COMMON-NAME-Epiperipatus-biolleyi-SPECIES-ACCOUNT.html
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    6:20 pm
  6. page Peripatopsis leonina edited This species is also known as the Lion's Hill Velvet Worm. {https://encrypted-tbn0.google.com/ima…
    This species is also known as the Lion's Hill Velvet Worm.
    {https://encrypted-tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRRi9_84puDHxW-dXg6Ya6HD5VYUOlQlKLD6Grtg5F6m7xppmT1} For all we know, the Peripatopsis Leonina might have already ended up like this.
    LastP. leonina known to live near the Cape Peninsula of South Africa, where it lived under small ravines or stones. last seen more
    ...
    years ago, and so it it has
    ...
    listed as extinct.extinct in 1996. However, duethere has not been any evidence to the discreet nature of the velvet worms,back up these claims, so it may still be alive, albeit extinct. The lossalive and out of it's habitatsight. Habitat destruction and increase of air pollution aroundare the area most likely have contributed to this.
    This velvet worm's native location is in the Cape Peninsula
    culprits of South Africa. There it lived in small ravines or under stones.
    The
    P. leonina's disappearance.
    The
    usual gestation
    ...
    were produced.
    It
    It took around
    ...
    is unknown.
    Sources:

    http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/16620/0
    http://www.arkive.org/south-african-peripatopsids/peripatopsis-spp/
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    6:18 pm
  7. page Ooperipatellus cryptus edited {http://www.polydesmida.info/tasmanianmultipedes/img-vw/oopecryp.jpg} http://www.polydesmida.in…
    {http://www.polydesmida.info/tasmanianmultipedes/img-vw/oopecryp.jpg}
    http://www.polydesmida.info/tasmanianmultipedes/onychophora.html
    Ooperipatellus cryptus are very hard to locate. They are mostly found in the southern portion of the Christmas Hills west of Smithton and the Dial Range area south of Penguin in Tasmania and Australia. They live in the wet, shady forest, shelters in leaf litter and rotting logs. They are usually 12 mm long. When they are disturbed while a juvenile, they will curl into a spiral which rolls away out of sight.
    The female O. cryptus contains an ovary with additional pouches, uteri, and a vagina. The ovary is made up of paired ovarian tubes. Fertilization presumably occurs in the oviducts and pass through the receptaculum seminis. This is usually found in the juvenile stage but it is recently reported that it occurs in adult females as well. This worm’s uteri also have increasing secretory production which contributes to chorion development. Cilia assist in the transport of eggs toward the vagina.
    Source:
    http://www.polydesmida.info/tasmanianmultipedes/onychophora.html
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    6:07 pm
  8. page Speleoperipatus spelaeus edited {S_spelaeus.png} http://www.earthsendangered.com/profile-1656.html S. spelaeus is endemic to …
    {S_spelaeus.png}
    http://www.earthsendangered.com/profile-1656.html
    S. spelaeus is endemic to Jamaica and listed as endangered in 1996. It is still currently being researched. Therefore, we know very little about this type of velvet worm. Velvet worms are land-dwelling creatures that are caterpillar-like in appearance (and they even possess antennae). This species like most velvet worms possess a claw-bearing and flattened cylindrical body-cross section that possess several rows of unstructured body appendages called “stub feet”. The claws range from 0.5 to 20 centimeters. This worm is bright green shown in the picture.
    Velvet worms are very secretive as they tend to choose to live in rotting logs and leaf litter. They are also very sensitive to light. They seem very small, but are actually very voracious and active carnivores. They prey on smaller animals like woodlice and small spiders. They capture prey by squirting a sticky slime from their oral tubes. This slime is also used for self-defense when they squirt it in the face of predators which would blind them allowing the worm to escape.
    ...
    agricultural purposes.
    Source:
    http://www.earthsendangered.com/profile-1656.html
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    6:05 pm
  9. page Peripatoides novaezealandiae edited {http://www.landcareresearch.co.nz/research/biosystematics/invertebrates/onychophora/images/pnov2_…
    {http://www.landcareresearch.co.nz/research/biosystematics/invertebrates/onychophora/images/pnov2_404.jpg} {http://soilbugs.massey.ac.nz/images/IMGP3606.jpg}
    P. novaezealandiae are a species that are found exclusively in New Zealand. They have 15 pairs of legs and distal papillae at the end of each foot. They come in a wide variety of color, from brown to purple-black to orange spots.
    There are many differences between the sexes in both patterns of growth and patterns of mortality. Mature males are smaller than mature females because females experience a longer period of growth than males. The large population variety also means that females are able to mate throughout their life while males aren’t. Females can carry the sperm of multiple males for up to 9 months.
    Sources:

    http://www.landcareresearch.co.nz/research/biosystematics/invertebrates/onychophora/taxonomy.asp
    http://soilbugs.massey.ac.nz/onychophora.php
    P. novaezealandiae are a species that are found exclusively in New Zealand. They have 15 pairs of legs and distal papillae at the end of each foot. They come in a wide variety of color, from brown to purple-black to orange spots. There are many differences between the sexes in both patterns of growth and patterns of mortality. Mature males are smaller than mature females because females experience a longer period of growth than males. The large population variety also means that females are able to mate throughout their life while males aren’t. Females have a widely varying numbers of sperm in their storage.Next Page
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    6:00 pm
  10. page Euperipatoides rowelli edited ... http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1017/S0952836905007090/pdf http://www.environment.gov.a…
    ...
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1017/S0952836905007090/pdf
    http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/action/non-marine-invertebrates/pubs/non-marine-invertebrates.pdf
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    5:58 pm

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